Wednesday, 2 August 2017

Barnet Payments for June - Capita earn a fortune and a booze up on the Council

June was a particularly expensive month with a total suppliers payments bill of £70 million, double the average. A few payments stand out as follows:

Re (the Capita joint venture that runs, planning, environmental health trading standards and many other regulatory services) were paid £20.36 million. That includes their monthly contract fee of £ 4.2 million plus assorted small payments plus one large one for £15.92 million. I will have to investigate why so much was paid to Re and for what - the summary merely says "various"

Capita were also paid a fraction under £2 million on the Customer Support contract. I find this surprising  given that, as the recent audit meeting identified, "as at 31 March 2017, the Council has a prepayment balance of £44.7 million in respect of its Customer and Support Group (CSG) contract". Barnet keep saying they are hard up and have to make cuts to key services, yet they can afford to make a massive advance payment to Capita. We were supposed to receive a credit of £500,000 for making the advance payment last December but so far I have seen no credit for this amount (but I have seen a bill for £500k  in May - I wonder if they got it muddled up?).

Comensura , through which all agency and interim staff are consolidated, billed Barnet £1.53 million in June. There was talk of the Council making major inroads into the agency staff bill, but in the first three months of this financial year they have already spent £4.23 million which doesn't bode well.

At a more micro level, yet again the council's desire for town twinning meant a nice party at The Haven Bistro & Bar in Whetstone. This happened last year as you can read here. This year they spend £30 less but still managed  to run up a bill of £1,521.90. Given everyone is being asked to volunteer and councillors do receive a generous allowance, especially if they chair a committee, I would have expected each attendee to have chipped in £50 to cover the bill. But this is Barnet and they don't do things that way here.



Friday, 28 July 2017

A Night of Shame But Who's to Blame - Last Night's Audit Fiasco


  • Mis-statement of £153 million worth of internal recharges
  • Material omissions from the grant income note
  • Errors in the exit packages note
  • Failure to submit Pensions Financial Statement on time
  • Concerns about contract monitoring

These were just a few of the problems discussed at last night's Audit Committee exposing Capita's shortcomings as the outsourced finance department of Barnet Council.

It started last week when the papers for the audit committee were published minus the critical External Auditor's report. It is pretty hard for an audit committee to sign off the annual accounts if they don't have the external auditor's report to review. The deadline for public questions was 10am on Monday morning but there was still no external auditors report. Eventually at 5.30pm on Tuesday I was told the report had now been published. The significance of this is however much greater as not only was this the first opportunity for the public to review the report but it was also the first opportunity for Committee Members to read it. The report can be read here and my questions and the responses can be read at the bottom of the page.

Cllr Hugh Rayner is the new Chairman of the Audit Committee and this was definitely a difficult first meeting. He introduced the meeting and allowed me to ask my supplementary questions. They simply highlighted the very real shortcomings of Capita in the audit process. Most of the points in my supplementary questions are then covered within the rest of this blog but one point glossed over in the meeting relates to the failure of a number of council members to submit related party disclosures.  This is a key part of the audit process and the auditor remarked that it was poor compared to other councils. In my supplementary question I asked why they wouldn't name and shame these seven councillors. They replied that the number had now fallen to five (although the auditor said he was still awaiting seven disclosures). Given that members knew this was being raised tonight and still hadn't bother to submit their disclosures suggests a level of complacency that is insulting to ordinary residents.

Cllr Rayner then changed the order of agenda to bring Auditors report up next. He started by expressing his and the committees dissatisfaction with the audit process and fact that members had only 24 hours to read the report. He noted that the report had so many "ifs and buts" that it was difficult to make a value judgement and finally he noted the failure to mention the Children's OFSTED report which is of major importance as part of the audit process.

The external auditor then got their chance to speak, expressing their concern at being unable to provide a final report. A couple of reasonable questions from Cllr Hutton and Cllr Finn and then Cllr Zinkin weighed in. He was concerned about the process - yes we all agree with that - and called the report from the auditors a "complete shambles". Whoa hang on a minute. The incompleteness of the report seemed entirely down to the errors and omissions made by Capita yet no criticism of them?

Cllr Zinkin then made reference to the lack of any mention of the OFSTED report on Children's services. The response from the Auditor was that officers had not brought it to their attention that the report had been received and that they had only discovered the report yesterday on the OFSTED website. Such a poor OFSTED report will now mean that the auditor is obliged to qualify the audit report on the use of resources, something that as far as I am aware has not happened previously. Cllr Zinkin followed up with a damning statement saying that if the auditor wasn't aware of the OFSTED report what other things are they not aware of. The auditors' defence was that the accounts were in such a mess that they had to throw more resources at sorting them out first.  From my perspective Cllr Zinkin needs to stop attacking the auditor and throw some of his outrage in the direction of Capita whose errors, omission and failures precipitated the situation. At this point Cllr Finn weighed in and, no doubt using his experience as an accountant, steered Cllr Zinkin away from scapegoating the auditor. Yes they should have let the chair of the audit committee know what a mess the accounts were in but they shouldn't be held responsible for the mess. He recommended "giving Capita a kick" as they are paid lots of money and haven't performed.

Cllr Khatri then hit the nail on the head by highlighting that there are different organisations involved here, the council, Capita, (plus all the other outsourced services such as Re, Cambridge education, NSL etc) and the auditors. All along I have been saying that the fragmentation of so many critical services represents a major risk that one hand doesn't know what the other is doing and that important matters fall down the cracks in between all the different parties.

At the urging of Cllr Cooke the meeting then moved onto the meat of the report. The auditors expressed concerns about how certain items were expressed and concerns about the adequacy and complexity of the IT systems including the billing of CIL payments at the right time and how reports are produced. There was some debate as to whether these were old problems or had occurred since Capita took over the finance and IT functions. Despite suggestions by Capita that these were long standing, the Director of Resources confirmed that CIL billing is the responsibility of Re (the Capita JV) and the accounting system was changed when Capita took over the contract in 2013. Yes, Barnet had paid a fortune for a sophisticated SAP system which upon appointment was duly dumped by Capita in favour of their own Integra system which seems to be at the root of a number of the issues that have arisen.

Next the discussion turned to pensions. An independent actuary is used to assess both the liabilities and the assets of the pension fund to give a net position. In terms of the liabilities these were adequately calculated but in terms of the assets the actuary was not given the details of the investment portfolio in time and therefore had to make assumptions which turned out to be incorrect and there will material changes to the net pension position. Capita are responsible for preparation of the pension fund accounts.

Next up was the issues of exit packages, the payoffs to officers, whereby exit packages should be disclosed when they are agreed not when they are paid. Does this mean that a number of exit packages are still to be disclosed having been agreed before year end but paid after year end?

They then moved on to the issue of budget and the fact that the council continue to overspend, this year drawing £18.5 million from reserves and general fund to meet the shortfall. "You are overspending" said the auditor. Perhaps the Tory strategy of multiple years of council tax freeze is now coming back to haunt them and residents.

Next was the the issue of contract monitoring. Given how heavily the council rely on outsourced services the auditor was surprised that a number of matters on contract management had been picked up by internal audit when they should have been picked up in the first instance by contract management. This is something I have raised repeatedly with councillors. Let's hope they will now listen to the auditor saying it as well.

The net outcome is there will now be an additional audit meeting on the 19th of September to go over the final audit report and to pick up all the outstanding points of which there are many.

This was a night of shame for Barnet; failure to meet government deadlines, numerous errors and omissions, failure of communications between officers, Capita and the auditors, over complex and inadequate IT systems, problems with contract monitoring and unsustainable overspending. I suspect that if more members of the public were aware of all these shortcoming they would maybe take a different perspective on how well the council is run.  It is a mess and outsourcing of critical functions  such as finance and IT seems to be at the heart of it.

I am sure that Mrs Angry who was also in attendance will give a far more accurate and readable appraisal of the meeting and I urge you to read her blog as well.




Monday, 17 July 2017

Children at Risk: Time to take responsibility

A joint statement from the Barnet Bloggers
  
“There are widespread and serious failures in the services provided to children and their families in Barnet. Inspectors identified a legacy of widespread poor practice and ongoing systemic failures and services that neither adequately ensure the safety, nor promote the welfare of children and young people”. 
Ofsted Inspection Report on Barnet Children’s Service July 2017

Over nearly a decade of scrutiny by Barnet bloggers, we have investigated and reported the seemingly endless sequence of scandals, blunders, and political folly created by Barnet’s Conservative councillors. The incomprehensible tale of the MetPro fiasco, the disgraceful confiscation of travel passes for disabled residents, the cutting of vital respite care for children at Mapledown School, which cares for children with profound disabilities, the illegal CPZ parking charges, are only some of the many examples of administrative incompetence – and worse – that we have pursued.

In all this time, in response to all of these disastrous situations, not one Conservative member has taken responsibility for the failure in services to what are very often the most vulnerable members of our community.

No one could be more vulnerable than a child: especially a child in care, whose well being has become the responsibility of the local authority, standing as a corporate parent.

Yet now we see the emergence of a most damning report from OFSTED, one that slates the provision of care services in Barnet for such children: a report that should shame any local authority, and would – anywhere else but in Barnet.

“The vast majority of care planning is ineffective. There is a lack of focus on measuring progress for children or their outcomes. When there is no progress, this is not re-evaluated or escalated effectively. This leads to drift and delay. This is particularly stark for a significant number of children who are victims of chronic long-term neglect and emotional abuse, who do not have the impact of this risk recognised, responded to or reduced, despite spending long periods subject to child protection planning … ”.

“Young people who go missing from care receive a poor service, because social workers do not find out enough about the risks to them. This means that young people who go missing are not always kept safe enough from dangers, such as gangs or adults sexually exploiting them”.

In any circumstances where there has been proven wrongdoing, or a failure in standards, it is usually the case, in Barnet, that officers are held responsible, and those elected members tasked with the responsibility – and paid generous allowances for those duties –of overseeing the enforcement of their own policies remain distanced from the consequences of their actions. We believe that this is wrong, and that Councillors should be held accountable.

In this case, we believe, the fault lies in a serious failure in leadership, oversight and scrutiny by the Children, Education, Libraries and Safeguarding Committee, chaired by Conservative Councillor Reuben Thompstone.

The same committee was responsible for the Mapledown cuts – later reversed, after protests from parents, and a public outcry; and was also the instrument of approval for the devastating programme of cuts to our library service, presented to residents as mere ‘refurbishment’, but which has seen the closure of children’s libraries, and the removal of access for under sixteen year olds from any library operating the newly unstaffed hours.

It seems to us that under this Conservative administration, children are seen not as our most precious asset, but an easy target for cuts, and the lowering of standards meant to ensure their protection, and wellbeing.

In 2014 Tory members approved a cost cutting restructuring of Family Services which has resulted in the use of agency social workers soaring from none in 2013, to £3.05 million per annum in 2016/17.

With the average agency social worker staying just 202 days, there has been a constant turnover of staff, and throughout this period, Children’s Services have been under constant pressure to meet the budget savings forecast.

We believe that pressure on budgets for local social workers responsible for ensuring the safety of young people has lead to the near destruction of the service, and a situation where there are simply not the resources to ensure vulnerable young people are given the life chances they deserve.

This cannot possibly be in the best interests of the children of this borough.

We therefore make the following suggestions: 
  • That there must be a full open, transparent, and independent public inquiry into what went wrong.
  • This inquiry must include a forensic audit of all correspondence between the Conservative administration and officers, regarding Children’s Services, to ensure that political interference has not, and cannot in future, prejudice the standard of care.
  • This inquiry should be concluded prior to May 2018, to allow the people of Barnet to pass their own judgement on the administration.
  • We call for the resignation of the Councillor in charge of Children’s Services, Cllr Reuben Thompstone.

  
Derek Dishman
John Dix
Theresa Musgrove
Roger Tichborne


Sunday, 2 July 2017

Supplier Payments for May

Yet again Capita have received a large payment (£1.9 million) in spite of  receiving an advance payment in December 2016 of £26.9 million.

The interim and agency staff contract with Comensura was lower this month but still hit £1.24 million. Time will tell whether Barnet really can get this down to a more realistic level.

I am currently going through all of the Capita and Re invoices for 2016-17 and will report back when I have a more detailed analysis.


Wednesday, 7 June 2017

Why I'll be voting Labour tomorrow - It's common sense

For the first time in many years we are faced with an election where there is a very clear difference between the two main parties. For me this is a choice between hope and despondency. It is now nine years since the global economic crisis, seven of those years under a Conservative government yet we are told that we face many more years of austerity, further cuts to services, tough working conditions and low pay.

In the past I worked with businesses that were failing. In some businesses it was necessary to make cuts to spending, in others it was pricing policy where they were covering marginal costs but not the underlying costs of the business. Often it was about growing the business out of trouble, typically by investing in the business to make it more effective and able to sell more products. In many ways this country is the same. In some areas there may be the need to make some savings but after so many years of cuts I doubt there is much left. If anything I think the cuts have gone too far restricting our ability to grow the economy and that has created a vicious circle from which we seem unable to escape without a radical change in policy. As such we need to invest in the country, building infrastructure, enhancing employment skills stimulating demand and positioning Britain as a forward thinking, effective and growing economy. Part of that is also about getting companies and the very richest in society to pay their fair share of tax to cover the underlying costs of our society, such as schools, hospitals and care for the elderly.

I looked at the Office of National Statistics figures for underemployment in the UK. Those are people who are willing and capable of working more hours. The latest figures show that there are 3.5 million in that group, a massive under-utilised resource that could be generating growth for the economy. However, the incentives to invest in new equipment and machinery seem limited if the growth of the economy is uncertain and if people have little spare money in their pockets to buy products.  I have spent the last three weeks looking for jobs. What continues to shock me is how many employers in central London still expect people to hold down responsible jobs for £7.50 and hour and for under 25s, even less (£5.60/hour for 18-20 year olds and £7.05 for 21-24 year olds). Given that the tube fare into London can be £47/week it leaves a minimal amount to survive on. Pushing the minimum wage up to £10/hr will help some of the very poorest, allowing them to spend some of that extra money buying goods and services. It will save on state benefits that will no longer be payable and generate additional tax income, both income tax and VAT on goods and services purchased.

Labour's proposals for investing in major infrastructure projects, building lots of new affordable homes and pushing up minimum wage all seem entirely sensible solutions creating jobs, creating demand for products and putting money into people's pockets. The construction sector reckon that around 90% of construction supplies are sourced in the UK. That is why it is such an effective economic stimulator as well as meeting the need of millions who are in cramped, expensive and insecure accommodation. In addition, the more people who are in work and spending money, the more tax is generated and the fewer benefits are paid out. Again it just makes sense.

Another Labour policy is the abolition of University tuition fees which also seems an eminently sensible idea. From my perspective the Student Loan scheme is one of the largest Ponzi schemes  ever conceived. The House of Commons Library analysis of student loan debt says; "The Government has projected that the outstanding cash value of publicly owned student debt in England will increase to around £100 billion in 2016-17, £500 billion in the mid-2030s and £1,000 billion (£1 trillion) in the late 2040s". The report also says that it estimates that 60% of post 2012 students(when tuition fees rose to £9,000 a year) will have some of their loans written off due to the failure to repay them in 25 years. This means the amount written off will run to hundreds of billions of pounds. In effect the government is lending money today and in 25 years time someone else will have to pick up the mess. At least a government paying for fees now is an honest way of treating this investment in growing our skills base.

Investing in the NHS is also an eminently sensible idea, There does need to be change to make sure patients get the best possible service, cost effectively, but closing A&E departments and running hospitals at 98% bed occupancy isn't the way to do it. The Conservatives will press ahead with the Naylor report which will result in NHS land and assets being sold off. The risk is that it will generate some cash in the short term but will limit the options for developing new treatment solutions such as polyclinics, and intermediate/ re-ablement care facilities in the future, something that seems to happen with depressing regularity.

There are lots of other reasons why voting Labour seems the only sensible option but probably more than anything else, it offers hope that things will get better. Another five years of austerity, low wages, declining public services and a growing inequity in society seems to be what the Conservatives are offering and that is not for me.





Friday, 5 May 2017

Barnet salaries May 2017

Below is a chart showing all the Barnet council employees paid more than an MP's salary (£74,000). For the full list of all senior salaries, you can find them here.


Friday, 28 April 2017

Barnet Year End Supplier Payments - as bad as anticipated

The March supplier payments are out today and I can now collate the entire financial year figures for 2016-17.



Let's start with Capita who in total this year have received £105 million on the CSG and Re contracts. Even though Capita were paid £26.9 million up front for 2017 charges last December they are still billing Barnet for reasons I cannot understand. In February it was £1.32 million and in March it was £1.54 million.


Since the start of the contract we have paid Capita £277 million and yet again I ask Richard Cornelius to show me the savings!

As for the other out of control contract, for agency and interim staff, it is, as predicted, within a whisker of £20 million. Barnet have consistently told me they are going to get this contract value down but it continues to rise. Four companies take a commission on the agency and interim staff spend which is money wasted. In addition having such a high proportion of agency and interim staff leads to a lack of consistency, new staff who have to be constantly re-briefed and who lack corporate memory of what has gone before. Agency and interim staff inevitably have less loyalty to Barnet which inevitably impacts on the quality of service residents receive.


Barnet spends a massive amount of money annually and I just don't get the impression someone is making sure every penny is wisely spent.